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Genuine Royston Cheap mail order shopping Sale price Turquoise Cuff Bracelet Silver Authen Sterling

Genuine Royston Turquoise Cuff Bracelet, Sterling Silver, Authen

$209

Genuine Royston Turquoise Cuff Bracelet, Sterling Silver, Authen

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Artisan: Larson Lee, Navajo Native American Tribe, New Mexico, USA

Genuine Stone: Royston Turquoise, Tonopah, NV, USA

Metal Composition: 925 Sterling Silver (Nickel amp; Lead Free) 

Production Method: One of a Kind Handmade

Hallmarks: "Larson L. Lee" and "Sterling"

Size: Women's Small. Fits approximately a 6.25 inch wrist

"strong"Measurements: Center Width: 1 inch, Gap: 1 inch, Inside Circumference: 6.25 inches

"strong"Image: Actual Item. Not a stock photo.

Take a trip with us down old Route 66 to a remote desert where the Pueblo Tribes of the American Southwest have been crafting small batches of handmade jewelry in their homes for over 200 years. Native artists use vibrant stones from local mines to express their culture and the spirit of the land. In this place, traditions and milestones are celebrated in Sterling Silver, and cherished pieces are handed down to the next generation of adventure seekers.

"strong"Appreciate the Difference: We are not manufacturers. Feel proud knowing that your piece was made on a kitchen table or family workshop on the Navajo Nation or Zuni Pueblo of New Mexico. Thank you for helping us provide empowerment and employment through the artistic expression of this remarkable culture. 

"strong"Enjoy the Benefits: Your order will be processed and shipped within 24 hours! We offer free first-class USPS shipping, ready-to-gift packaging, and an easy 30 day return policy! In business for over 20 years, Timberline Traders has outstanding 5-star reviews on all major e-commerce sites! 

"strong"Don't Miss Out: Due to the use of traditional processes, styles are very limited in quantity. Thank you for clicking the "buy button" now!

Genuine Royston Turquoise Cuff Bracelet, Sterling Silver, Authen

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